Thursday, November 10, 2016

859 Hillary to bankers: I'm for Free trade (TPP) & Open Borders - Wikileaks. Media buries it under Trump sex story

Hillary to bankers: I'm for Free trade (TPP) & Open Borders - Wikileaks.
Media buries it under Trump sex story

Newsletter published on 8 October 2016


(1) Hillary to bankers: I'm for Free trade (TPP) & Open Borders - Wikileaks
(2) Hillary: 'You need both a public and a private position'. Would cut
Social Security benefits
(3) Excerpts of Hillary Clinton’s Paid Speeches to Goldman Sachs Finally
Leaked
(4) Hillary declines to confirm authenticity of documents but calls them
'stolen,' blames Putin
(5) Wikileaks leaks excerpts of Hillary's paid speeches to Banks, Donors
- WSJ
(6) Hillary tells Donors: Sanders supporters 'are living in their
parents’ basement'
(7) Hillary is Candidate for the 1%, Trump for the 99%. Ministry of
Propaganda (US Media) told to destroy him
(8) Billionaires backing Hillary, because Trade deals give power to
International Corporations
(9) Wikileaks Releases Hillary's Paid Wall Street Speech Transcripts -
Zero Hedge

(1) Hillary to bankers: I'm for Free trade (TPP) & Open Borders - Wikileaks

THE NYT PRINT edition had this headline:  Leaked Speech Excerpts Show
Clinton at Ease With Wall Street and Free trade.

But the online edition removed 'and Free trade' from the headline.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/08/us/politics/hillary-clinton-speeches-wikileaks.html?_r=0

Leaked Speech Excerpts Show a Hillary Clinton at Ease With Wall Street

By AMY CHOZICK, NICHOLAS CONFESSORE and MICHAEL BARBARO

OCT. 7, 2016

In lucrative paid speeches that Hillary Clinton delivered to elite
financial firms but refused to disclose to the public, she displayed an
easy comfort with titans of business, embraced unfettered international
trade and praised a budget-balancing plan that would have required cuts
to Social Security, according to documents posted online Friday by
WikiLeaks.

The tone and language of the excerpts clash with the fiery liberal
approach she used later in her bitter primary battle with Senator Bernie
Sanders of Vermont and could have undermined her candidacy had it become
public.

Mrs. Clinton comes across less as a firebrand than as a technocrat at
home with her powerful audience, willing to be critical of large
financial institutions but more inclined to view them as partners in
restoring the country’s economic health.

In the excerpts from her paid speeches to financial institutions and
corporate audiences, Mrs. Clinton said she dreamed of "open trade and
open borders" throughout the Western Hemisphere. Citing the back-room
deal-making and arm-twisting used by Abraham Lincoln, she mused on the
necessity of having "both a public and a private position" on
politically contentious issues. Reflecting in 2014 on the rage against
political and economic elites that swept the country after the 2008
financial crash, Mrs. Clinton acknowledged that her family’s rising
wealth had made her "kind of far removed" from the struggles of the
middle class.

The passages were contained in an internal review of Mrs. Clinton’s paid
speeches undertaken by her campaign, which was identifying potential
land mines should the speeches become public. They offer a glimpse at
one of the most sought-after troves of information in the 2016
presidential race — and an explanation, perhaps, for why Mrs. Clinton
has steadfastly refused demands by Mr. Sanders and Donald J. Trump, her
Republican rival, to release them.

Mrs. Clinton’s campaign would not confirm the authenticity of the
documents. They were released on Friday night by WikiLeaks, the hacker
collective founded by the activist Julian Assange, saying that they had
come from the email account of John D. Podesta, Mrs. Clinton’s campaign
chairman.

In a statement, a Clinton spokesman, Glen Caplin, suggested that the
leak could have been engineered by Russian officials determined to help
Mr. Trump and noted that a Twitter message from WikiLeaks promoting the
documents had incorrectly identified Mr. Podesta as a co-owner of his
brother’s lobbying firm.

But Clinton officials did not deny that the email containing the
excerpts was real.

The leaked email, dated Jan. 25, does not contain Mrs. Clinton’s full
speeches to the financial firms, leaving it unclear what her overall
message was to these audiences.

But in the excerpts, Ms. Clinton demonstrates her long and warm ties to
some of Wall Street’s most powerful figures. In a discussion in the fall
of 2013 with Lloyd Blankfein, a friend who is the chief executive of
Goldman Sachs, Mrs. Clinton said that the political climate had made it
overly difficult for wealthy people to serve in government.

"There is such a bias against people who have led successful and/or
complicated lives," Mrs. Clinton said. The pressure on officials to sell
or divest assets in order to serve, she added, had become "very onerous
and unnecessary."

In a separate speech to Goldman Sachs employees the same month, Mrs.
Clinton said it was an "oversimplification" to blame the global
financial crisis of 2008 on the U.S. banking system.

"It was conventional wisdom," Mrs. Clinton said of the tendency to blame
the banking system. "And I think that there’s a lot that could have been
avoided in terms of both misunderstanding and really politicizing what
happened." Photo John Podesta, Mrs. Clinton’s campaign chairman, on the
campaign plane last month. Credit Doug Mills/The New York Times

And she praised a deficit-reduction proposal from President Obama’s
fiscal commission that called for raising the Social Security retirement
age, saying that the commission’s leaders "had put forth the right
framework."

Such comments could have proven devastating to Mrs. Clinton during the
Democratic primary fight, when Mr. Sanders promoted himself as the enemy
of Wall Street and of a rigged economic system.

Several of the most eye-popping passages ultimately express more nuanced
explanations of her views. When Mrs. Clinton describes herself as "far
removed" from average Americans and their finances, she had just
finished describing her growing appreciation for how "anxiety and even
anger in the country over the feeling that the game is rigged." And she
reminds the audience that her father "loved to complain about big
business and big government."

The Clintons have made more than $120 million in speeches to Wall Street
and special interests since Bill Clinton left the White House in 2001.
Mrs. Clinton typically earned $225,000 for speeches, though she
sometimes donated her fees to her family foundation.

"I kind of think if you’re going to be paid $225,000 for a speech, it
must be a fantastic speech," Mr. Sanders said during the primary, "a
brilliant speech which you would want to share with the American people."

As her race against Mr. Sanders — who now campaigns for Mrs. Clinton —
grew unexpectedly contentious and close, Mrs. Clinton sought to portray
herself as deeply skeptical of Wall Street and eager to punish its
wayward leaders.

"I believe strongly that we need to make sure that Wall Street never
wrecks Main Street again," Mrs. Clinton said in January. "No bank is too
big to fail, and no executive is too powerful to jail."

As she sought to burnish her image as an advocate of working America,
Mrs. Clinton declared her opposition to the Trans-Pacific Partnership,
Mr. Obama’s 12-nation trade pact, and distanced herself from Nafta,
which her husband signed into law.

But in a 2013 speech to a Brazilian bank, Mrs. Clinton took a far
different approach. "My dream," she said, "is a hemispheric common
market, with open borders, sometime in the future."

Some of her paid remarks embrace the view that the public can benefit
when Wall Street partners with government. When it comes to writing
effective financial regulations, Mrs. Clinton said, "The people that
know the industry better than anybody are the people who work in the
industry."

Foreign hackers — authorized by Russian security agencies, according to
national security officials — have successfully penetrated the
operations of the Democratic Party and its candidates over the past
year. They broke into the email servers of the Democratic National
Committee, revealing embarrassing internal messages in which party
leaders who were supposed to be neutral expressed their preference for
Mrs. Clinton even as she was campaigning against Mr. Sanders. And Mr.
Assange is an avowed critic of Mrs. Clinton who has made clear that he
wishes to hurt her chances of winning the presidency.

Half of all registered voters said it bothered them "a lot" that Mrs.
Clinton had given numerous paid speeches to Wall Street banks, according
to a Bloomberg Politics poll in June.

Asked in an interview that month if the practice was self-defeating,
given the anger over income inequality, Mrs. Clinton responded that her
predecessors as secretary of state had given paid speeches, too.

"I actually think it makes sense," she said. "Because a lot of people
know you have a front-row seat in watching what’s going on in the world."

Find out what you need to know about the 2016 presidential race today,
and get politics news updates via Facebook, Twitter and the First Draft
newsletter.

A version of this article appears in print on October 8, 2016, on page
A14 of the New York edition with the headline: Leaked Speech Excerpts
Show Clinton at Ease With Wall Street and Free trade.

(2) Hillary: 'You need both a public and a private position'. Would cut
Social Security benefits


http://www.ibtimes.com/political-capital/hillary-clinton-paid-speeches-wall-street-promoted-commission-pushed-social

Hillary Clinton, In Paid Speeches To Wall Street, Promoted Commission
That Pushed Social Security Cuts

By David Sirota @davidsirota AND Avi Asher-Schapiro On 10/07/16 AT 7:24 PM

During the Democratic presidential primary, Hillary Clinton was
criticized for refusing to release the transcripts of paid speeches she
gave after she ended her term as Secretary of State. Now,  just a month
before the election, a transparency group has published what it says are
excerpts of those speeches -- and the remarks show Clinton appearing to
reassure Wall Street with rhetoric that differed from the kind she
voiced in more public forums.

The email was released by the website Wikileaks, as part of what it says
are more than 2,600 emails hacked from Clinton campaign chairman John
Podetsa. The Clinton campaign has neither confirmed nor denied the
authenticty of the emails.

In the email published by Wikileaks, Clinton tells a real estate
industry trade association that she believes that as a public official,
"You need both a public and a private position" on major issues.

Clinton promised on the campaign trail that she would oppose the
12-nation Trans Pacific Partnership, and that she "will stop any trade
deal that kills jobs or holds down wages." But in the email released by
Wikileaks, she is shown telling a Brazilian bank that, "My dream is a
hemispheric common market, with open trade and open borders." She also
is quoted saying: "We have to resist Protectionism, other kinds of
barriers to market access and to trade and I would like to see this get
much more attention and be not just a policy for a year under president
X or president Y but a consistent one."

Clinton on the campaign trail declared, "I won’t cut Social Security."
Yet in the email’s excerpts of her Morgan Stanley speech, she lauded a
presidential commission that proposed changes that would slash Social
Security benefits, according to experts.

The email shows Clinton specifically telling Morgan Stanley that the
Simpson-Bowles commission "put forth the right framework" for dealing
with fiscal challenges. She also said "the Simpson-Bowles framework and
the big elements of it were right."

As the nonpartisan Center on Budget and Policy Priorities reported in
2011, that commission proposed a plan to "cut benefits for the vast
majority of Social Security recipients, weaken the link between a
recipient’s benefits and past earnings (which could undermine public
support for the program), and, despite the claims of the co-chairs, fail
to protect most low-income workers from benefit cuts."

Clinton was criticized during the Democratic primary for her ties to
Wall Street -- and she depicted herself as someone who had been tough on
the financial industry. But in other speech excerpts from the email,
Clinton appeared to laud the financial industry, and tout her work
helping enrich it.

The email shows that in a speech to a securities law firm, she said "I
represented and worked with so many talented principled people who made
their living in finance." The email shows her also saying that while she
supports some efforts to raise taxes on the financial executives, "I
represented them and did all I could to make sure they continued to
prosper."  (In a previous interview, Clinton said of the financial
industry bailout: "I think the banks of New York and our other financial
institutions are probably the biggest winners in this, which is one of
the reasons why in the end, despite my serious questions about it, I
supported it.")

Another excerpt in the email shows Clinton suggesting that Wall Street
executives are best positioned to write government rules that regulate
Wall Street.

"There's nothing magic about regulations, too much is bad, too little is
bad," she told a Goldman Sachs symposium. "How do you get to the golden
key, how do we figure out what works? And the people that know the
industry better than anybody are the people who work in the industry."

(3) Excerpts of Hillary Clinton’s Paid Speeches to Goldman Sachs Finally
Leaked


https://theintercept.com/2016/10/07/excerpts-of-hillary-clintons-paid-speeches-to-goldman-sachs-finally-leaked/

Lee Fang, Zaid Jilani, Alex Emmons, Naomi LaChance

Oct. 8 2016, 8:31 a.m.

Excerpts of Hillary Clinton’s remarks during paid speeches to Goldman
Sachs, Deutsche Bank, Morgan Stanley, and other groups were leaked
online Friday afternoon by WikiLeaks. Clinton, who was paid upwards of
$225,000 per speech, earned more than $22 million on the paid speaking
circuit after resigning as secretary of state.

The excerpts are revealed in an email from Tony Carrk, the research
director of the Clinton campaign, to John Podesta, the campaign
chairman, and other top campaign officials. Carrk, who did not respond
to a request for comment, highlighted in the memo the most politically
damaging quotes from each paid speech, under headers including "CLINTON
ADMITS SHE IS OUT OF TOUCH," "CLINTON SAYS YOU NEED TO HAVE A PRIVATE
AND PUBLIC POSITION ON POLICY," and "CLINTON REMARKS ARE PRO KEYSTONE
AND PRO TRADE."

The wealth Clinton accumulated was a topic at the paid events.

Discussing middle class economic anxieties, Clinton told a crowd at a
Goldman Sachs-sponsored speech that she is now "kind of far removed
because the life I’ve lived and the economic, you know, fortunes that my
husband and I now enjoy, but I haven’t forgotten it."

But the discussions were also an opportunity for Clinton to speak
candidly about policy, politics, and her approach to governing.

Touching on her view of developing financial regulations, Clinton
declared to a crowd of Goldman Sachs bankers that in order to "figure
out what works," the "people that know the industry better than anybody
are the people who work in the industry."

At the Goldman Sachs Builders and Innovators Summit, Clinton responded
to a question from chief executive Lloyd Blankfein, who quipped that you
"go to Washington" to "make a small fortune." Clinton agreed with the
comment and complained about ethics rules that require officials to
divest from certain assets before entering government. "There is such a
bias against people who have led successful and/or complicated lives,"
Clinton said.

At a speech for Morgan Stanley on April 18, 2013, Clinton praised the
Simpson-Bowles deficit reduction plan — which would reduce corporate tax
rates while raising the Social Security age. "But Simpson-Bowles — and I
know you heard from Erskine earlier today — put forth the right
framework. Namely, we have to restrain spending, we have to have
adequate revenues, and we have to incentivize growth. It’s a three-part
formula," she said.

Clinton also told a housing trade group in 2013 that on certain issues,
she has "a public and a private position." "If everybody’s watching, you
know, all of the back room discussions and the deals, you know, then
people get a little nervous, to say the least," said Clinton. "So, you
need both a public and a private position."

The Intercept was the first media outlet to ask Clinton directly if she
would release the transcripts of her paid speeches to Goldman Sachs.
When approached at an event in Manchester, New Hampshire, Clinton
laughed off the question.

The issue was raised again during the Democratic primary debates and in
other media events. In February of this year, the New York Times
editorial board called for Clinton to release her speech transcripts,
declaring that voters "have every right to know what Mrs. Clinton told
these groups."

According to reports, the campaign reviewed the speech transcripts but
decided against releasing them out of fear that she would appear too
friendly to banks and other donor interest groups.

But there are signs in the emails released by WikiLeaks that she also
took a fairly progressive stance on certain topics, including health
care reform.

During a talk in Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 2013, Clinton praised the
single-payer model for health care reform. "If you look at the
single-payer systems, like Scandinavia, Canada, and elsewhere, they can
get costs down because, you know, although their care, according to
statistics, overall is as good or better on primary care," she said,
adding that there were some drawbacks. "They do impose things like
waiting times, you know."

But during the campaign this year, she dismissed the idea, declaring
that single payer will "never, ever" happen in the U.S. Audio obtained
by The Intercept last week showed Clinton dismissing the concept of free
health care during another private event with donors.

(4) Hillary declines to confirm authenticity of documents but calls them
'stolen,' blames Putin

http://time.com/4523749/hillary-clinton-wikileaks-leaked-emails-john-podesta/

What Leaked Emails Reveal About Hillary Clinton’s Campaign

Sam Frizell @Sam_Frizell

Oct. 7, 2016

The website Wikileaks published emails on Friday apparently belonging to
Hillary Clinton’s campaign chairman, John Podesta, marking the latest
results of a hacking operations on internal Democratic Party communications.

If they are authentic, Friday’s late-afternoon dump of emails sent and
received by Podesta offer a glimpse into the inner workings of the
Clinton campaign as it weathered its formative stages and the Democratic
primary. Podesta, a canny and top-level operator in the Clinton campaign
who served in both former President Bill Clinton and President Obama’s
White House, often had the final say on key campaign decisions.

The emails were released just hours after the White House officially
accused the Russian government of meddling in the U.S. election, citing
the hack of internal Democratic Party emails published in late July.

The Clinton campaign declined to confirm the authenticity of the
documents but called them "stolen," the latest move by Russian
operatives they say are trying to help Donald Trump.

"We are not going to confirm the authenticity of stolen documents
released by Julian Assange who has made no secret of his desire to
damage Hillary Clinton," said spokesman Glen Caplin in a statement.

Former national security officials warned earlier a statement to Yahoo
News that Russian hackers "release fake documents look the same." Still,
many of the emails included the authentic addresses of top-level
campaign staffers and matched the dates of campaign events.

Most of the emails reflect mundane campaign communications and do not
reveal wrongdoing. They are a window into the Clinton campaign’s
operations, as Podesta was included on emails about messaging against
Clinton’s opponent in the Democratic primary, Vermont Sen. Bernie
Sanders, as well as how to defend Clinton against attacks over her
family’s foundation and her email controversy.

The emails also showed that top staff voiced concerns over Clinton’s
paid Wall Street speeches long before she began her campaign. There are
moments of levity, too, and her campaign and hotly debated, over many
emails, what joke their boss should tell at the Iowa Jefferson-Jackson
Democratic Party Dinner in Des Moines, Iowa.

Here’s what the emails showed:

Robby Mook, the campaign manager, was worried about the Clinton
Foundation’s ties to banks. Democrats have questioned Clinton’s decision
after she left the State Department to give paid speeches to banks,
industry groups and universities. Mook, who went on to manage Clinton’s
campaign, suggested in an email that it was unwise to involve Goldman
Sachs at a Clinton Foundation event in 2014, though it is unclear
precisely what event he was referring to. "[I]t’s a little troubling
that Goldman Sachs was selected for the foundation event," said Mook in
his email.

Some of Clinton’s paid speeches were apparently revealed. An email to
Podesta from January 2016 quoted sections of Clinton’s speeches; in one
from 2013 Clinton conceded to needing a "public and a private position"
in politics, and she said in 2014 she was aware of security concerns
around using a BlackBerry at the State Department and that emails could
be vulnerable to hacking. She also said she supported free trade and
"open borders," though it is unclear from the context exactly what she
meant.

There was endless back-and-forth over what joke Clinton should tell in a
speech. The most senior advisers to the campaign debated over multiple
emails what joke the former Secretary of State should tell at an
important dinner in Des Moines, Iowa, the Jefferson-Jackson Dinner, in
October 2015. The exchange came days after Clinton’s 11-hour grilling on
Capitol Hill by the Republican-led House Select Committee on Benghazi.

Should they tell a joke about Rep. Trey Gowdy, who headed the committee?
Podesta thought so. Clinton should say in her speech "I used to be
obsessed with Donald Trump’s hair, that was until I got to spend 11
hours staring at the top of Trey Gowdy’s head," Podesta suggested in an
email chain.

Jim Margolis, another adviser, suggested a line by former president Bill
Clinton that referenced Sanders, who had refused in the previous debate
to attack Clinton for her email controversy. "You all think wjc’s joke
is too much about her kinda wishing after hour 8 > that Bernie would
come through the door with his damn email line ..,?" Margolis said.

Others worried it sacrificed the high ground for Clinton after her
successful showing at the hearing, when Republicans conceded they had
learned nothing new.

If anything, the exchange shows how meticulously her top aides often
debate over minutiae in her speeches.

Clinton’s advisers saw Jeb Bush’s economic message as a threat. Back in
February 2015 when former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush was raising millions of
dollars for a future juggernaut presidential campaign and he appeared in
early polls to be the Republican frontrunner, Clinton’s aides examined
the language of his early economic pitch. The speech, which called for
less regulation and the "right to rise," made her aides nervous.

"He’s in a fertile zone, GOP primary electorate notwithstanding. For
those of you who’ve had to put up with my interest exploring
‘opportunity’ framing, he has some of the elements here," said Jim
Margolis, an adviser.

"It’s a scary new wrapping paper for trickle down. Very much in synch
with what we’re hearing in groups," said a pollster for the Clinton
campaign, Jeff Liszt.

"Very little in this speech that HRC wouldn’t say," added adviser Mandy
Grunwald.

They debated over how to criticize Sanders The campaign’s top brass
debated in February 2016 how to target the Vermont Senator, who was
proving to be a greater challenge to Clinton than her campaign had
expected. Adviser Mandy Grunwald suggested in an email chain a number of
"negatives" or possible attack lines against Sanders, including
attacking Sanders for proposing high levels of spending that would
increase middle class taxes, an argument the Clinton campaign did use.

She also suggested criticizing Sanders’ proposed cuts to security
spending made Americans less safe, and unearthing essays Sanders wrote
about rape and female sexuality when he was in his late 20s. At the
time, top aides were frustrated by Sanders’ rise. Indeed, Grunwald
conceded in an email to Podesta, "most of our attacks haven’t been working."

Clinton apparently wanted to produce a video to respond to the
controversy over her foundation. The campaign was hampered from the
beginning by allegations about the Clinton Foundation and its acceptance
of foreign donations, and Podesta’s emails show that the nascent
campaign struggled to respond.

In one exchange from early May, aides appeared to debate releasing a
video in which Clinton would answer questions about the foundation. It
was an idea Clinton herself seemed to endorse, but the video was never
ultimately produced.

"She believes she needs to do this video is because her integrity is
being attacked and she is the only one who can say she didnt make a
decision as secstate based on a donor," said Clinton campaign vice
chairwoman Huma Abedin in the May 2015 email.

Clinton cut a section from her book about Keystone Pipeline. Conscious
of the tense debate between environmentalists and the energy industry
over the the pipeline, Clinton deleted a section from a draft of her
book, Hard Choices, that discussed the project. In the original section,
according to an email to Podesta, Clinton called the pipeline a "tough
question" and said that she hoped that "this important decision can be
insulated from politics."

Podesta called for the section to be removed. "Cut," he wrote in an email.

Clinton declined to voice her personal view until after a thorough
review. She ultimately said she opposed it.

With reporting by Zeke J. Miller

(5) Wikileaks leaks excerpts of Hillary's paid speeches to Banks, Donors
- WSJ


http://www.wsj.com/articles/wikileaks-stirs-up-trouble-for-hillary-clinton-1475891284

WikiLeaks Stirs Up Trouble for Hillary Clinton

Email correspondence is said to show excerpts of paid speeches before
her presidential bid

By Rebecca Ballhaus

Oct. 7, 2016 9:48 p.m. ET

The organization WikiLeaks on Friday released what it claimed to be
Clinton campaign email correspondence revealing excerpts from paid
speeches that Hillary Clinton gave in recent years, before her
presidential bid.

A Clinton campaign spokesman declined to verify whether the documents
are authentic.

The emails appear to show Mrs. Clinton taking a tone in private that is
more favorable to free trade and to banks than she has often taken on
the campaign trail. The emails also suggest she was aware of security
concerns regarding electronic devices, which could feed into criticism
that Mrs. Clinton was careless with national secrets when she was
secretary of state.

The release marks the latest time WikiLeaks has inserted itself into
this year’s presidential campaign, and it came the same day the U.S.
intelligence community accused the Russian government of trying to
interfere in the U.S. elections by purposefully leaking emails hacked
from the Democratic National Committee and other entities. The
intelligence agencies alleged the hacks were directed by the most senior
officials in the Russian government, with WikiLeaks one of the entities
whose methods are consistent with those of a Russia-directed effort.

"Earlier today the U.S. government removed any reasonable doubt that the
Kremlin has weaponized WikiLeaks to meddle in our election and benefit
Donald Trump’s candidacy," said Clinton spokesman Glen Caplin in a
statement. "We are not going to confirm the authenticity of stolen
documents released by [WikiLeaks founder] Julian Assange who has made no
secret of his desire to damage Hillary Clinton."

Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta, whose emails were WikiLeaks’s
primary target, sent several tweets on the subject late Friday.

"I’m not happy about being hacked by the Russians in their quest to
throw the election to Donald Trump," he wrote. "Don’t have time to
figure out which docs are real and which are faked." He added that the
organization’s claim on its website that he owns the Podesta Group, a
lobbying firm headed by his brother, Tony, was "completely false."

Some of the documents in the most recent WikiLeaks release are similar
in their design to documents released in recent days by DCLeaks.com,
another entity that the U.S. intelligence community says has published
documents stolen by the Russian government. The documents have proven
difficult to authenticate.

In the two years between her time at the State Department and her
presidential campaign, Mrs. Clinton earned millions on the paid speech
circuit, including $4.1 million from financial institutions, according
to financial disclosures. This became an issue during Mrs. Clinton’s
Democratic primary campaign when Sen. Bernie Sanders called for her to
release the speech transcripts, particularly for speeches she gave to
major financial firms. At the time, Mrs. Clinton said she would "look
into" releasing the transcripts but hasn’t provided them.

This past January, the WikiLeaks documents suggest, Clinton campaign
research director Tony Carrk emailed excerpts of Mrs. Clinton’s speeches
to senior campaign officials, including Mr. Podesta and communications
director Jennifer Palmieri, calling them the "flags from HRC’s paid
speeches."

Mr. Carrk said he had obtained the transcripts from "HWA," an apparent
reference to the Harry Walker Agency, which arranged Mrs. Clinton’s paid
speeches after she left the State Department in 2013.

"I put some highlights below," Mr. Carrk wrote. "There is a lot of
policy positions that we should give an extra scrub with Policy."

The more than 80 pages of transcript excerpts appear to have been broken
down by a campaign official into sections titled "Awkward," "Benghazi,"
"Email," and "Helping Corporations," among others.

The excerpts appear to show Mrs. Clinton taking a more friendly attitude
toward financial firms than she does on the campaign trail. At a 2013
speech at a Goldman Sachs event, she is shown lamenting that in
Washington, "There is such a bias against people who have led successful
and/or complicated lives." In another speech at a Goldman event, she
told the room, "You are the smartest people."

At another Goldman Sachs speech, discussing how to avoid another
financial crisis, she said the "politicizing" of the financial crisis
could have been avoided with greater transparency, and told the bankers,
"You guys help us figure it out and let’s make sure that we do it right
this time." A year later, at a speech paid for by Deutsche Bank, she
said that some element of financial reform "really has to come from the
industry itself."

On the campaign trail, Mrs. Clinton has issued a suite of proposals
aimed at curbing some Wall Street risk-taking and holding more
individuals accountable for misconduct.

In a 2014 speech, the excerpts show, Mrs. Clinton said that as a U.S.
senator from 2001 to 2009, she had won support from Wall Street but
still supported regulations that were tough on the industry, including
closing a loophole that allows carried interest to be taxed at a lower rate.

Mrs. Clinton also expressed strong support for free trade in a 2013
speech paid for by a Brazilian bank. While she endorsed negotiations of
the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade pact during her tenure as secretary
of state, Mrs. Clinton has since opposed the trade pact, saying it does
not do enough to produce new jobs and raise wages.

"My dream is a hemispheric common market, with open trade and open
borders," she said in 2013, according to the transcript. "We have to
resist Protectionism, other kinds of barriers to market access and to
trade."

Mrs. Clinton also acknowledged the security concerns surrounding
BlackBerry devices, an issue that has taken on increased political
significance since reports last year that she used a private email
server as secretary of state. A Federal Bureau of Investigation probe
found no evidence that Mrs. Clinton’s server, which contained emails
with classified information, was hacked during her tenure.

"At the State Department we were attacked every hour, more than once an
hour, by incoming efforts to penetrate everything we had," Mrs. Clinton
is shown saying at a 2014 speech at a General Electric Co. global
meeting. "And that was true across the U.S. government."

At the same event, Mrs. Clinton is shown lamenting that when she arrived
at the State Department, employees were "not mostly permitted to have
handheld devices." She added, "I mean, so you’re thinking how do we
operate in this new environment dominated by technology, globalizing
forces? We have to change, and I can’t expect people to change if I
don’t try to model it and lead it."

Another excerpt shows Mrs. Clinton saying that when it comes to
politics, there is a need for "both a public and a private position,"
because "backroom discussions" make "people get a little nervous."

"You just have to sort of figure out how to … balance the public and the
private efforts that are necessary to be successful, politically," she
is shown to have said at a 2013 speech said to be paid for by the
National Multi-Housing Council.

—Damian Paletta and Peter Nicholas contributed to this article.

Write to Rebecca Ballhaus at Rebecca.Ballhaus@wsj.com

(6) Hillary tells Donors: Sanders supporters 'are living in their
parents’ basement'


http://www.politico.com/story/2016/09/hillary-clinton-bernie-sanders-supporters-audio-leak-228997

Clinton gives her take on Sanders supporters in leaked fundraising recording

'Half the people don’t know what that means, but it’s something that
they deeply feel.'

By Cristiano Lima

09/30/16 09:21 PM EDT

Updated 09/30/16 10:12 PM EDT

Hacked audio of a conversation between Hillary Clinton and donors during
a February fundraising event shows the Democrat nominee describing
Bernie Sanders supporters as "children of the Great Recession" who are
"living in their parents’ basement."

Speaking at a Virginia fundraiser hosted by former U.S. ambassador
Beatrice Welters, Clinton says in a clip released by the Free Beacon
that many of her former primary opponent's supporters sought things like
"free college, free health care," saying that she preferred to occupy
the space "from the center-left to the center-right" on the political
spectrum.

During the conversation, also reported in the Intercept, Clinton
confesses to feeling "bewildered" by those to her far-left and far-right
in the election.

"There is a strain of, on the one hand, the kind of populist,
nationalist, xenophobic, discriminatory kind of approach that we hear
too much of from the Republican candidates," she said. "And on the other
side, there’s just a deep desire to believe that we can have free
college, free healthcare, that what we’ve done hasn’t gone far enough,
and that we just need to, you know, go as far as, you know, Scandinavia,
whatever that means, and half the people don’t know what that means, but
it’s something that they deeply feel."

"I think we all should be really understanding of that," Clinton said.

The audio, which according to the Free Beacon was "revealed by hackers
who breached the email account of a campaign staffer," surfaces the same
week that Sanders hit the campaign trail to try to win those same young
voters that Clinton has struggled to attract since clinching the
Democratic nomination.

Editor’s note: The headline and lede of this story have been changed to
better reflect Clinton’s tone. The audio was originally published on
Sept. 27, not Friday as first reported. Trump Hillary 1st Debate - NAFTA
& TPP To: Peter Mailstar <peter@mailstar.net>

RickWells.US Trump Nails Clinton On NAFTA And TPP

Published on 27 Sep 2016

Hillary Clinton defended NAFTA and the accompanying unemployment as a
good trade deal, in the face of attacks by Donald Trump. She dismissed
his statement that NAFTA was one of the worst things that ever happened
to manufacturing, a treaty signed by her husband, Predator Bill, as just
being his opinion. Trump cites the 30-50 percent reduction in
manufacturing in key states as being more than just an opinion.

He says "NAFTA is the worst trade deal maybe ever signed anywhere but
certainly ever signed in this country and now you want to approve
Trans-Pacific Partnership. You were totally in favor of it then you
heard what I was saying, how bad it is and you said 'I can't win that
debate.' But you know that if you did win you would approve that and
that will be almost as bad as NAFTA. Nothing will ever top NAFTA.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMuGRqAtqsk

(7) Hillary is Candidate for the 1%, Trump for the 99%. Ministry of
Propaganda (US Media) told to destroy him


http://www.counterpunch.org/2016/10/07/washington-leads-the-world-to-war/

OCTOBER 7, 2016

Washington Leads the World to War

by  PAUL CRAIG ROBERTS

What must the world think watching the US presidential campaign?  Over
time US political campaigns have become more unreal and less related to
voters’ concerns, but the current one is so unreal as to be absurd.

The offshoring of American jobs by global corporations and the
deregulation of the US financial system have resulted in American
economic failure.  One might think that this would be an issue in a
presidential campaign.

The neoconservative ideology of US world hegemony is driving the US and
its vassals into conflict with Russia and China.  The risks of nuclear
war are higher than at any previous time in history.  One might think
that this also would be an issue in a presidential campaign.

Instead, the issues are Trump’s legal use of tax laws and his
non-hostile attitude toward President Putin of Russia.

One might think that the issue would be Hillary’s extremely hostile
attitude toward Putin ("the new Hitler"), which promises conflict with a
major nuclear power.

As for benefitting from tax laws, Pat Buchanan pointed out that Hillary
used to her benefit a loss almost as large as Trump’s and during the
Arkansas years Hillary even took a tax deduction for itemized pieces of
used clothing donated to a charity, including $2 for one of Bill’s used
underpants.

The vice presidential "debate" revealed that the Democratic Party’s
candidate is so ignorant that he thinks Putin, who is democratically
elected and has enormous public support, is a dictator.

Here is what we know about the two presidential candidates.  Hillary has
a long list of scandals from Whitewater and Vince Foster to Benghazi and
violation of national security protocols. She is bought-and-paid-for by
the oligarchs on Wall Street, in the mega-banks, and in the
military-security complex as well as by foreign interests.  The proof is
the Clinton’s $120 million personal forture and the $1,600 million in
their foundation.  Goldman Sachs did not pay Hillary $675,000 for three
20-minute speeches for the wisdom contained in the speeches.

What we know about Trump is that the oligarchic establishment cannot
stand him and has ordered the Ministry of Propaganda, a.k.a., the US
media, to destroy him.

Clearly, Hillary is the candidate of the One Percent, and Trump is the
candidate for the rest of us.

Unfortunately, about half of the 99 percent is too dumb to know this.

Moreover, if Trump were to end up in the White House, it doesn’t mean he
could prevail over the oligarchy.

The oligarchy is entrenched in Washington with control over economic and
foreign policy positions, think tanks and other lobbyists, and the media.

The people control nothing.

What does the world think when they see Donald Trump damned because he
doesn’t want war with Russia or the American economy moved offshore?

Where in American politics do Washington’s European, British, Canadian,
Australian, and Japanese vassals see leadership worthy of their
sacrifice of sovereignty and independent foreign policy?  Where do they
even see a modicum of intelligence?

Why does the world look to the most stupid, vile, arrogant, corrupt and
murderous government on the planet for leadership?

War is the only destination to which Washington can lead.

(8) Billionaires backing Hillary, because Trade deals give power to
International Corporations

http://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2016/10/05/why-are-billionaires-backing-hillary-and-icing-trump.html

Why Are Billionaires Backing Hillary And Icing Trump?

  Eric ZUESSE | 05.10.2016

No US Presidential candidate since William McKinley in 1896 has received
as nearly-unanimous financial backing from America’s wealthiest 0.01% as
Hillary Clinton.

What William Jennings Bryan was to them in 1896, is what Donald John
Trump is to them 120 years later in 2016.

Eugene H. Roseboom’s essential 1957 masterpiece, A History of
Presidential Elections, described (starting on page 315) the 1896
campaign, by saying:

«Men of wealth, alarmed at the enthusiasm aroused by Bryan and taking at
face value the extreme utterances of populist orators, fought back with
powerful economic weapons in an attempt to coerce, where persuasion
might fail. Labor, the uncertain partner in Bryan’s poorly constructed
farmer-labor coalition, was threatened with loss of employment in case
Bryan won. Buyers gave orders for materials subject to cancellation if
McKinley lost. In some cases, workers were told not to report Wednesday
morning after election unless McKinley won. Such methods, coupled with
the steady pounding-away at the workingman with the prosperity argument,
made of little account the efforts fo those champions of the
downtrodden, Governor Altgeld, Eugene V. Debs, and Henry George… One of
Bryan’s greatest handicaps was lack of newspaper support in the larger
cities. The Republican press, the independent journals, the influential
weeklies such as Harper’s Weekly, the Nation, and the Independent, and
most of the larger Democratic papers in the metropolitan centers, were
against him».

Instead of «coercion» then, there is more deceit now, which I have
previously described regarding this present campaign. As I noted there,
«Sometimes, things in politics are the opposite of the way they seem.
The Presidential contest between the ‘liberal’ Hillary Clinton’ and the
‘conservative’ Donald Trump is perhaps the most extreme example of this».

Why, then, are the billionaires so overwhelmingly backing Hillary
Clinton? There are many reasons (which I summarized in my article, just
linked-to), but the main one is the proposed so-called ‘trade’
agreements, which are actually treaties that grant to international
corporations the ability to sue for multi-billions of dollars any
signatory nation that increases an existing regulation to make food or
any other product safer for consumers, or to protect the environment, or
to protect workers. International corporations say that setting a higher
safety-standard comes out of their own hides, costs them profits.

Furthermore, another enormous advantage that such treaties provide to
the owners of international corporations is that these treaties would be
adjudicated in any such case, not in a court of law in any given
nation’s judicial system and according to any given nation’s
Constitution, but instead by a mere three-person, corporate-attorney
panel, of «arbitrators» in each case, whose ruling (regardless of any
such Constitution or legal system) in any given case, would be final:
non-appealable in any court of law anywhere. Any nation’s Constitution
and laws can be ignored there.

This will be an evolving international-corporate-sovereign world
government, no democratic one at all. In other words: national
sovereignty would be yielded up to international corporations, whose
powers to add such lawsuits to their existing profit-base, by suing
signatory nations for enormous fines for allegedly having reduced their
stockholders’ ‘right' to profit’ (a ‘right’ they hold to be higher than
that of any citizen or mere voter) by having raised any such regulatory
standard, is the ultimate gift that Hillary Clinton has done everything
that she can throughout her career to provide to her financial backers.

They want what is currently national sovereignty; they want to supersede
it by their international-corporate sovereignty: rights of international
corporations to sue nations, and no countervailing right of nations to
sue those billionaires who own controlling blocs of stock in those
corporations. To be a voter then will become to control nothing; to be a
holder of controlling blocs of stock in international corporations will
become to control not just this but many nations. That is the ultimate
gift, and buying Hillary Clinton is the most important way for
billionaires to win it. (Notwithstanding her campaign rhetoric that is
designed to convey the opposite impression to the public.)

On September 30th, Britain’s Guardian headlined, «EU and US trade
negotiators seek to get TTIP talks back on track», and reported that,
«Officials will rush to ‘lock in progress’ on controversial trade deal
before Barack Obama leaves [the] White House in January… Trade
negotiators will meet in New York next week to search for common ground
on the controversial EU-US trade deal, which has been buffeted by strong
opposition on both sides of the Atlantic. A team of 90 EU negotiators
will travel to New York for five days of talks on the Transatlantic
Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), starting on Monday [October 3rd]».

They still haven’t given up on this dream of Obama and the Clintons —
and they won’t. It’s practically the whole ballgame.

US President Barack Obama had wanted his three proposed mega-‘trade’
deals — TTIP, TPP, and TISA — to become his legacy achievement for the
aristocracy that has backed his entire political career, and Hillary
Clinton is his big hope to get that done for him and for their backers;
and, on the economic front (not to mention the national-sovereignty or
democracy front) this is the biggest stake, the biggest real issue, of
the current Presidential campaign.

Donald Trump doesn’t talk about it in this light, but only about
«shipping American jobs overseas» (which is actually just a part of
this, another very profitable part of it for the owners of international
corporations) and no one even asks him about it, but the billionaires
seem to be persuaded, anyway, that he’s against their taking over the
sovereignty of this and many other countries — against taking
sovereignty for themselves, and so against ending democracy for all
citizens in any signatory nations.

The only other issue that the international aristocracy are equally
united about is their desire to conquer and take control of Russia (via
conquering Russian’s few remaining allies, which were Saddam Hussein in
2003, Muammar Gaddafi in 2011,Viktor Yanukovych in 2014, and Bashar
al-Assad not yet overthrown and replaced — but aiming ultimately to
replace Vladimir Putin in Russia itself). Apparently, the billionaires
are also persuaded that a President Hillary Clinton will press forward
for them on that «neoconservative» front too, and that a President
Donald Trump won’t.

All the rest of the US Presidential campaign is just rhetoric, to fool
the masses on these and the other issues. (After all, it’s the way
‘democratic’ politics is done in any «oligarchy» — otherwise called
aristocracy.)

The bottom line for the billionaires (both Democratic and Republican) is
(and has been) (even before the primaries started) to ‘elect’ Hillary
Clinton as the successor to Barack Obama. It’s a one-party government,
with two competing segments, one of which is ‘liberal’ and the other of
which is ‘conservative’, but both segments of which represent merely
different segments of the billionaire-class (not at all the public) —
and Donald Trump is winning the financial support of a minority even
within his own Party’s segment of the US aristocracy.

That too is similar to 1896. But the stakes this time are much bigger:
world dictatorship, and even world war. (Trump seems to be strongly
against both; Hillary is clearly pushing toward both, and is furthermore
backed by the aristocracy that demands both.)

(9) Wikileaks Releases Hillary's Paid Wall Street Speech Transcripts -
Zero Hedge


http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-10-07/wikileaks-releases-hundreds-exceprts-hillary-clintons-wall-street-speech-transcripts

Wikileaks Releases Hillary's Paid Wall Street Speech Transcripts:
Hundreds Of "Sensitive" Excerpts

by Tyler Durden

Oct 8, 2016 9:31 AM

While the media is transfixed with the just released Washington Post
leak of a private Donald Trump conversation from 2005 in which he was
speaking "lewdly" about women, and for which he has apologized, roughly
at the same time, Wikileaks released part one of what it dubbed the
"Podesta emails", which it describes as "a series on deals involving
Hillary Clinton campaign Chairman John Podesta. Mr Podesta is a
long-term associate of the Clintons and was President Bill Clinton's
Chief of Staff from 1998 until 2001. Mr Podesta also owns the Podesta
Group with his brother Tony, a major lobbying firm and is the Chair of
the Center for American Progress (CAP), a Washington DC-based think tank."

While the underlying story in this specific case involves the alleged
kickbacks received by the Clinton Foundation from the Russian
government-controlled "Uranium One", a story which has been profiled
previously by the NYT, and about which Wikileaks adds that "as Russian
interests gradually took control of Uranium One millions of dollars were
donated to the Clinton Foundation between 2009 and 2013 from individuals
directly connected to the deal including the Chairman of Uranium One,
Ian Telfer. Although Mrs Clinton had an agreement with the Obama White
House to publicly identify all donors to the Clinton Foundation, the
contributions from the Chairman of Uranium One were not publicly
disclosed by the Clintons", what caught our attention is an email from
Tony Carr, a Research Director at Hillary for America, in which he lay
outs hundreds of excerpts from the heretofore missing transcripts of
Hillary Clinton's infamous Wall Street speeches, with an emphasis on
those which should be flagged as they may be damaging to Hillary.

But first, here are the greatest hits as conveniently flagged by the
Clinton Campaign itself on page one of the 80 page addendum dubbed "awkward"

     Hillary Clinton: "I'm Kind Of Far Removed" From The Struggles Of
The Middle Class "Because The Life I've Lived And The Economic, You
Know, Fortunes That My Husband And I Now Enjoy." "And I am not taking a
position on any policy, but I do think there is a growing sense of
anxiety and even anger in the country over the feeling that the game is
rigged.  And I never had that feeling when I was growing up.  Never. I
mean, were there really rich people, of course there were.  My father
loved to complain about big business and big government, but we had a
solid middle class upbringing.  We had good public schools.  We had
accessible health care.  We had our little, you know, one-family house
that, you know, he saved up his money, didn't believe in mortgages.  So
I lived that.  And now, obviously, I'm kind of far removed because the
life I've lived and the economic, you know, fortunes that my husband and
I now enjoy, but I haven't forgotten it."  [Hillary Clinton Remarks at
Goldman-Black Rock, 2/4/14]

     When A Questioner At Goldman Sachs Said She Raised Money For
Hillary Clinton In 2008, Hillary Clinton Joked "You Are The Smartest
People." "PARTICIPANT:  Secretary, Ann Chow from Houston, Texas.  I have
had the honor to raise money for you when you were running for president
in Texas. MS. CLINTON:  You are the smartest people. PARTICIPANT:  I
think you actually called me on my cell phone, too.  I talked to you
afterwards." [ Speech to Goldman Sachs, 2013 IBD Ceo Annual Conference,
6/4/13]

     Hillary Clinton Joked That If Lloyd Blankfein Wanted To Run For
Office, He Should "Would Leave Goldman Sachs And Start Running A Soup
Kitchen Somewhere." "MR. BLANKFEIN:  I’m saying for myself.
MS. CLINTON:  If you were going to run here is what I would tell you to
do --             MR. BLANKFEIN:  Very hypothetical. MS. CLINTON:  I
think you would leave Goldman Sachs and start running a soup kitchen
somewhere.             MR. BLANKFEIN:  For one thing the stock would go
up. MS. CLINTON:  Then you could be a legend in your own time both when
you were there and when you left." [ Speech to Goldman Sachs, 2013 IBD
Ceo Annual Conference, 6/4/13]

     Hillary Clinton Noted President Clinton Had Spoken At The Same
Goldman Summit Last Year, And Blankfein Joked "He Increased Our Budget."
"SECRETARY CLINTON:  Well, first, thanks for having me here and giving
me a chance to know a little bit more about the builders and the
innovators who you’ve gathered.  Some of you might have been here last
year, and my husband was, I guess, in this very same position.  And he
came back and was just thrilled by— MR. BLANKFEIN:  He increased our
budget.              SECRETARY CLINTON:  Did he? MR. BLANKFEIN:  Yes.
That’s why we --              SECRETARY CLINTON:  Good.  I think he—I
think he encouraged you to grow it a little, too.  But it really was a
tremendous experience for him, so I’ve been looking forward to it and
hope we have a chance to talk about a lot of things." [Goldman Sachs
Builders And Innovators Summit, 10/29/13]

     Clinton Said When She Got To State, Employees "Were Not Mostly
Permitted To Have Handheld Devices."  "You know, when Colin Powell
showed up as Secretary of State in 2001, most State Department employees
still didn't even have computers on their desks. When I got there they
were not mostly permitted to have handheld devices. I mean, so you're
thinking how do we operate in this new environment dominated by
technology, globalizing forces? We have to change, and I can't expect
people to change if I don't try to model it and lead it."  [Clinton
Speech For General Electric’s Global Leadership Meeting – Boca Raton,
FL, 1/6/14]

     Clinton Joked It’s "Risky" For Her To Speak To A Group Committed To
Futures Markets  Given Her Past Whitewater Scandal.  "Now, it's always a
little bit risky for me to come speak to a group that is committed to
the futures markets because -- there's a few knowing laughs -- many
years ago, I actually traded in the futures markets. I mean, this was so
long ago, it was before computers were invented, I think. And I worked
with a group of like-minded friends and associates who traded in pork
bellies and cotton and other such things, and I did pretty well. I
invested about a thousand dollars and traded up to about a hundred
thousand. And then my daughter was born, and I just didn't think I had
enough time or mental space to figure out anything having to do with
trading other than trading time with my daughter for time with the rest
of my life. So I got out, and I thought that would be the end of it."
[Remarks to CME Group, 11/18/13]

     Hillary Clinton Said Jordan Was Threatened Because "They Can’t
Possibly Vet All Those Refugees So They Don’t Know If, You Know,
Jihadists Are Coming In Along With Legitimate Refugees."  "So I think
you’re right to have gone to the places that you visited because there’s
a discussion going on now across the region to try to see where there
might be common ground to deal with the threat posed by extremism and
particularly with Syria which has everyone quite worried, Jordan because
it’s on their border and they have hundreds of thousands of refugees and
they can’t possibly vet all those refugees so they don’t know if, you
know, jihadists are coming in along with legitimate refugees. Turkey for
the same reason."  [Jewish United Fund Of Metropolitan Chicago Vanguard
Luncheon, 10/28/13]

     Hillary Clinton Said Her Dream Is A Hemispheric Common Market, With
Open Trade And Open Markets.  "My dream is a hemispheric common market,
with open trade and open borders, some time in the future with energy
that is as green and sustainable as we can get it, powering growth and
opportunity for every person in the hemisphere." [05162013 Remarks to
Banco Itau.doc, p. 28] * * *

Here is the full email by Carrk as of January 25, 2016 laying out all
the potentially delicate issues that the Clinton campaign would wish to
avoid from emerging. One thing to note: as Michael Tracey points out,
the Hillary campaign had all the transcripts at her disposal all along,
despite repeated deflection.  Perhaps as a result of this leak she will
now release the full transcripts for the "proper context." * * *

From:tcarrk@hillaryclinton.com To: jpalmieri@hillaryclinton.com,
john.podesta@gmail.com, slatham@hillaryclinton.com,
kschake@hillaryclinton.com, creynolds@hillaryclinton.com,
bfallon@hillaryclinton.com  Date: 2016-01-25 00:28 Subject:

HRC Paid Speeches

Team,

Attached are the flags from HRC’s paid speeches we have from HWA. I put
some highlights below. There is a lot of policy positions that we should
give an extra scrub with Policy.

In terms of what was opened to the press and what was not, the
Washington Examiner got a hold of one of the private speech contracts
(her speeches to universities were typically open press), so this is
worth a read
http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/clintons-speeches-are-cozy-for-wall-streeters-but-closed-to-journalists/article/2553294/section/author/dan-friedman

CLINTON ADMITS SHE IS OUT OF TOUCH

Hillary Clinton: "I'm Kind Of Far Removed" From The Struggles Of The
Middle Class "Because The Life I've Lived And The Economic, You Know,
Fortunes That My Husband And I Now Enjoy." "And I am not taking a
position on any policy, but I do think there is a growing sense of
anxiety and even anger in the country over the feeling that the game is
rigged.  And I never had that feeling when I was growing up.  Never. I
mean, were there really rich people, of course there were.  My father
loved to complain about big business and big government, but we had a
solid middle class upbringing.  We had good public schools.  We had
accessible health care.  We had our little, you know, one-family house
that, you know, he saved up his money, didn't believe in mortgages.  So
I lived that.  And now, obviously, I'm kind of far removed because the
life I've lived and the economic, you know, fortunes that my husband and
I now enjoy, but I haven't forgotten it."  [Hillary Clinton Remarks at
Goldman-Black Rock, 2/4/14]

CLINTON SAYS YOU NEED TO HAVE A PRIVATE AND PUBLIC POSITION ON POLICY

Clinton: "But If Everybody's Watching, You Know, All Of The Back Room
Discussions And The Deals, You Know, Then People Get A Little Nervous,
To Say The Least. So, You Need Both A Public And A Private Position."
CLINTON: You just have to sort of figure out how to -- getting back to
that word, "balance" -- how to balance the public and the private
efforts that are necessary to be successful, politically, and that's not
just a comment about today. That, I think, has probably been true for
all of our history, and if you saw the Spielberg movie, Lincoln, and how
he was maneuvering and working to get the 13th Amendment passed, and he
called one of my favorite predecessors, Secretary Seward, who had been
the governor and senator from New York, ran against Lincoln for
president, and he told Seward, I need your help to get this done. And
Seward called some of his lobbyist friends who knew how to make a deal,
and they just kept going at it. I mean, politics is like sausage being
made. It is unsavory, and it always has been that way, but we usually
end up where we need to be. But if everybody's watching, you know, all
of the back room discussions and the deals, you know, then people get a
little nervous, to say the least. So, you need both a public and a
private position. And finally, I think -- I believe in evidence-based
decision making. I want to know what the facts are. I mean, it's like
when you guys go into some kind of a deal, you know, are you going to do
that development or not, are you going to do that renovation or not, you
know, you look at the numbers. You try to figure out what's going to
work and what's not going to work. [Clinton Speech For National
Multi-Housing Council, 4/24/13]

CLINTON TALKS ABOUT HOLDING WALL STREET ACCOUNTABLE ONLY FOR POLITICAL
REASONS

Clinton Said That The Blame Placed On The United States Banking System
For The Crisis "Could Have Been Avoided In Terms Of Both
Misunderstanding And Really Politicizing What Happened." "That was one
of the reasons that I started traveling in February of '09, so people
could, you know, literally yell at me for the United States and our
banking system causing this everywhere.  Now, that's an
oversimplification we know, but it was the conventional wisdom. And I
think that there's a lot that could have been avoided in terms of both
misunderstanding and really politicizing what happened with greater
transparency, with greater openness on all sides, you know, what
happened, how did it happen, how do we prevent it from happening?  You
guys help us figure it out and let's make sure that we do it right this
time. And I think that everybody was desperately trying to fend off the
worst effects institutionally, governmentally, and there just wasn't
that opportunity to try to sort this out, and that came later." [Goldman
Sachs AIMS Alternative Investments Symposium, 10/24/13] * * *

Clinton: "Even If It May Not Be 100 Percent True, If The Perception Is
That Somehow The Game Is Rigged, That Should Be A Problem For All Of
Us." "Now, it's important to recognize the vital role that the financial
markets play in our economy and that so many of you are contributing to.
  To function effectively those markets and the men and women who shape
them have to command trust and confidence, because we all rely on the
market's transparency and integrity. So even if it may not be 100
percent true, if the perception is that somehow the game is rigged, that
should be a problem for all of us, and we have to be willing to make
that absolutely clear.  And if there are issues, if there's wrongdoing,
people have to be held accountable and we have to try to deter future
bad behavior, because the public trust is at the core of both a free
market economy and a democracy." [Clinton Remarks to Deutsche Bank, 10/7/14]

CLINTON SUGGESTS WALL STREET INSIDERS ARE WHAT IS NEEDED TO FIX WALL STREET

Clinton Said Financial Reform "Really Has To Come From The Industry
Itself." "Remember what Teddy Roosevelt did.  Yes, he took on what he
saw as the excesses in the economy, but he also stood against the
excesses in politics.  He didn't want to unleash a lot of nationalist,
populistic reaction.  He wanted to try to figure out how to get back
into that balance that has served America so well over our entire
nationhood. Today, there's more that can and should be done that really
has to come from the industry itself, and how we can strengthen our
economy, create more jobs at a time where that's increasingly
challenging, to get back to Teddy Roosevelt's square deal.  And I really
believe that our country and all of you are up to that job." [Clinton
Remarks to Deutsche Bank, 10/7/14] * * *

Speaking About The Importance Of Proper Regulation, Clinton Said "The
People That Know The Industry Better Than Anybody Are The People Who
Work In The Industry." "I mean, it's still happening, as you know.
People are looking back and trying to, you know, get compensation for
bad mortgages and all the rest of it in some of the agreements that are
being reached. There's nothing magic about regulations, too much is bad,
too little is bad.  How do you get to the golden key, how do we figure
out what works?  And the people that know the industry better than
anybody are the people who work in the industry. And I think there has
to be a recognition that, you know, there's so much at stake now, I
mean, the business has changed so much and decisions are made so
quickly, in nano seconds basically.  We spend trillions of dollars to
travel around the world, but it's in everybody's interest that we have a
better framework, and not just for the United States but for the entire
world, in which to operate and trade." [Goldman Sachs AIMS Alternative
Investments Symposium, 10/24/13]

CLINTON ADMITS NEEDING WALL STREET FUNDING

Clinton Said That Because Candidates Needed Money From Wall Street To
Run For Office, People In New York Needed To Ask Tough Questions About
The Economy Before Handing Over Campaign Contributions. "Secondly,
running for office in our country takes a lot of money, and candidates
have to go out and raise it.  New York is probably the leading site for
contributions for fundraising for candidates on both sides of the aisle,
and it's also our economic center. And there are a lot of people here
who should ask some tough questions before handing over campaign
contributions to people who were really playing chicken with our whole
economy." [Goldman Sachs AIMS Alternative Investments Symposium,
10/24/13] * * *

Clinton: "It Would Be Very Difficult To Run For President Without
Raising A Huge Amount Of Money And Without Having Other People
Supporting You Because Your Opponent Will Have Their Supporters." "So
our system is, in many ways, more difficult, certainly far more
expensive and much longer than a parliamentary system, and I really
admire the people who subject themselves to it.  Even when I, you know,
think they should not be elected president, I still think, well, you
know, good for you I guess, you're out there promoting democracy and
those crazy ideas of yours. So I think that it's something -- I would
like -- you know, obviously as somebody who has been through it, I would
like it not to last as long because I think it's very distracting from
what we should be doing every day in our public business.  I would like
it not to be so expensive.  I have no idea how you do that. I mean, in
my campaign -- I lose track, but I think I raised $250 million or some
such enormous amount, and in the last campaign President Obama raised
1.1 billion, and that was before the Super PACs and all of this other
money just rushing in, and it's so ridiculous that we have this kind of
free for all with all of this financial interest at stake, but, you
know, the Supreme Court said that's basically what we're in for.  So
we're kind of in the wild west, and, you know, it would be very
difficult to run for president without raising a huge amount of money
and without having other people supporting you because your opponent
will have their supporters.  So I think as hard as it was when I ran, I
think it's even harder now." [Clinton Speech For General Electric’s
Global Leadership Meeting – Boca Raton, FL, 1/6/14]

CLINTON TOUTS HER RELATIONSHIP TO WALL STREET AS A SENATOR

Clinton: As Senator, "I Represented And Worked With" So Many On Wall
Street And "Did All I Could To Make Sure They Continued To Prosper" But
Still Called For Closing Carried Interest Loophole. In remarks at
Robbins, Gellar, Rudman & Dowd in San Diego, Hillary Clinton said, "When
I was a Senator from New York, I represented and worked with so many
talented principled people who made their living in finance.  But even
thought I represented them and did all I could to make sure they
continued to prosper, I called for closing the carried interest loophole
and addressing skyrocketing CEO pay. I also was calling in '06, '07 for
doing something about the mortgage crisis, because I saw every day from
Wall Street literally to main streets across New York how a
well-functioning financial system is essential. So when I raised early
warnings about early warnings about subprime mortgages and called for
regulating derivatives and over complex financial products, I didn't get
some big arguments, because people sort of said, no, that makes sense.
But boy, have we had fights about it ever since." [Hillary Clinton’s
Remarks at Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd in San Diego, 9/04/14] * * *

Clinton On Wall Street: "I Had Great Relations And Worked So Close
Together After 9/11 To Rebuild Downtown, And A Lot Of Respect For The
Work You Do And The People Who Do It." "Now, without going over how we
got to where we are right now, what would be your advice to the Wall
Street community and the big banks as to the way forward with those two
important decisions? SECRETARY CLINTON:  Well, I represented all of you
for eight years.  I had great relations and worked so close together
after 9/11 to rebuild downtown, and a lot of respect for the work you do
and the people who do it, but I do -- I think that when we talk about
the regulators and the politicians, the economic consequences of bad
decisions back in '08, you know, were devastating, and they had
repercussions throughout the world." [Goldman Sachs AIMS Alternative
Investments Symposium, 10/24/13]

CLINTON TALKS ABOUT THE CHALLENGES RUNNING FOR OFFICE

Hillary Clinton Said There Was "A Bias Against People Who Have Led
Successful And/Or Complicated Lives," Citing The Need To Divese Of
Assets, Positions, And Stocks.   "SECRETARY CLINTON:  Yeah.  Well, you
know what Bob Rubin said about that.  He said, you know, when he came to
Washington, he had a fortune.  And when he left Washington, he had a
small --              MR. BLANKFEIN:  That’s how you have a small
fortune, is you go to Washington. SECRETARY CLINTON:  You go to
Washington.  Right.              But, you know, part of the problem with
the political situation, too, is that there is such a bias against
people who have led successful and/or complicated lives.  You know, the
divestment of assets, the stripping of all kinds of positions, the sale
of stocks.  It just becomes very onerous and unnecessary." [Goldman
Sachs Builders And Innovators Summit, 10/29/13]

CLINTON SUGGESTS SHE IS A MODERATE

Clinton Said That Both The Democratic And Republican Parties Should Be
"Moderate." "URSULA BURNS:  Interesting.  Democrats? SECRETARY CLINTON:
  Oh, long, definitely. URSULA BURNS:  Republicans? SECRETARY CLINTON:
Unfortunately, at the time, short. URSULA BURNS:  Okay.  We'll go back
to questions. SECRETARY CLINTON:  We need two parties. URSULA BURNS:
Yeah, we do need two parties. SECRETARY CLINTON:  Two sensible,
moderate, pragmatic parties." [Hillary Clinton Remarks, Remarks at
Xerox, 3/18/14] * * *

Clinton: "Simpson-Bowles… Put Forth The Right Framework. Namely, We Have
To Restrain Spending, We Have To Have Adequate Revenues, And We Have To
Incentivize Growth. It's A Three-Part Formula… And They Reached An
Agreement. But What Is Very Hard To Do Is To Then Take That Agreement If
You Don't Believe That You're Going To Be Able To Move The Other Side."
SECRETARY CLINTON:  Well, this may be borne more out of hope than
experience in the last few years. But Simpson-Bowles -- and I know you
heard from Erskine earlier today -- put forth the right framework.
Namely, we have to restrain spending, we have to have adequate revenues,
and we have to incentivize growth. It's a three-part formula.  The
specifics can be negotiated depending upon whether we're acting in good
faith or not. And what Senator Simpson and Erskine did was to bring
Republicans and Democrats alike to the table, and you had the full range
of ideological views from I think Tom Coburn to Dick Durbin.  And they
reached an agreement. But what is very hard to do is to then take that
agreement if you don't believe that you're going to be able to move the
other side.  And where we are now is in this gridlocked dysfunction. So
you've got Democrats saying that, you know, you have to have more
revenues; that's the sine qua non of any kind of agreement.  You have
Republicans saying no, no, no on revenues; you have to cut much more
deeply into spending. Well, looks what's happened.  We are slowly
returning to growth.  It's not as much or as fast as many of us would
like to see, but, you know, we're certainly better off than our European
friends, and we're beginning to, I believe, kind of come out of the long
aftermath of the '08 crisis. [Clinton Speech For Morgan Stanley,
4/18/13]* * *

Clinton: "The Simpson-Bowles Framework And The Big Elements Of It Were
Right… You Have To Restrain Spending, You Have To Have Adequate
Revenues, And You Have To Have Growth." CLINTON: So, you know, the
Simpson-Bowles framework and the big elements of it were right.  The
specifics can be negotiated and argued over.  But you got to do all
three.  You have to restrain spending, you have to have adequate
revenues, and you have to have growth.  And I think we are smart enough
to figure out how to do that. [Clinton Speech For Morgan Stanley, 4/18/13]

CLINTON IS AWARE OF SECURITY CONCERNS AROUND BLACKBERRIES

Clinton: "At The State Department We Were Attacked Every Hour, More Than
Once An Hour By Incoming Efforts To Penetrate Everything We Had.  And
That Was True Across The U.S. Government." CLINTON: But, at the State
Department we were attacked every hour, more than once an hour by
incoming efforts to penetrate everything we had.  And that was true
across the U.S. government.  And we knew it was going on when I would go
to China, or I would go to Russia, we would leave all of our electronic
equipment on the plane, with the batteries out, because this is a new
frontier.  And they're trying to find out not just about what we do in
our government.  They're trying to find out about what a lot of
companies do and they were going after the personal emails of people who
worked in the State Department. So it's not like the only government in
the world that is doing anything is the United States.  But, the United
States compared to a number of our competitors is the only government in
the world with any kind of safeguards, any kind of checks and balances.
  They may in many respects need to be strengthened and people need to
be reassured, and they need to have their protections embodied in law.
But, I think turning over a lot of that material intentionally or
unintentionally, because of the way it can be drained, gave all kinds of
information not only to big countries, but to networks and terrorist
groups, and the like. So I have a hard time thinking that somebody who
is a champion of privacy and liberty has taken refuge in Russia under
Putin's authority.  And then he calls into a Putin talk show and says,
President Putin, do you spy on people?  And President Putin says, well,
from one intelligence professional to another, of course not.  Oh, thank
you so much.  I mean, really, I don't know.  I have a hard time
following it. [Clinton Speech At UConn, 4/23/14] * * *

Hillary Clinton: "When I Got To The State Department, It Was Still
Against The Rules To Let Most -- Or Let All Foreign Service Officers
Have Access To A Blackberry." "I mean, let's face it, our government is
woefully, woefully behind in all of its policies that affect the use of
technology.  When I got to the State Department, it was still against
the rules to let most -- or let all Foreign Service Officers have access
to a Blackberry.  You couldn't have desktop computers when Colin Powell
was there.  Everything that you are taking advantage of, inventing and
using, is still a generation or two behind when it comes to our
government." [Hillary Clinton Remarks at Nexenta, 8/28/14] * * *

Hillary Clinton: "We Couldn't Take Our Computers, We Couldn't Take Our
Personal Devices" Off The Plane In China And Russia. "I mean, probably
the most frustrating part of this whole debate are countries acting like
we're the only people in the world trying to figure out what's going on.
  I mean, every time I went to countries like China or Russia, I mean,
we couldn't take our computers, we couldn't take our personal devices,
we couldn't take anything off the plane because they're so good, they
would penetrate them in a minute, less, a nanosecond.  So we would take
the batteries out, we'd leave them on the plane." [Hillary Clinton
Remarks at Nexenta, 8/28/14] * * *

Clinton Said When She Got To State, Employees "Were Not Mostly Permitted
To Have Handheld Devices." "You know, when Colin Powell showed up as
Secretary of State in 2001, most State Department employees still didn't
even have computers on their desks.  When I got there they were not
mostly permitted to have handheld devices.  I mean, so you're thinking
how do we operate in this new environment dominated by technology,
globalizing forces?  We have to change, and I can't expect people to
change if I don't try to model it and lead it." [Clinton Speech For
General Electric’s Global Leadership Meeting – Boca Raton, FL, 1/6/14] * * *

Hillary Clinton Said You Know You Can’t Bring Your Phone And Computer
When Traveling To China And Russia And She Had To Take Her Batteries Out
And Put them In A Special Box. "And anybody who has ever traveled in
other countries, some of which shall remain nameless, except for Russia
and China, you know that you can’t bring your phones and your computers.
  And if you do, good luck.  I mean, we would not only take the
batteries out, we would leave the batteries and the devices on the plane
in special boxes.  Now, we didn’t do that because we thought it would be
fun to tell somebody about.  We did it because we knew that we were all
targets and that we would be totally vulnerable. So it’s not only what
others do to us and what we do to them and how many people are involved
in it.  It’s what’s the purpose of it, what is being collected, and how
can it be used.  And there are clearly people in this room who know a
lot about this, and some of you could be very useful contributors to
that conversation because you’re sophisticated enough to know that it’s
not just, do it, don’t do it.  We have to have a way of doing it, and
then we have to have a way of analyzing it, and then we have to have a
way of sharing it." [Goldman Sachs Builders And Innovators Summit,
10/29/13] * * *

Hillary Clinton Lamented How Far Behind The State Department Was In
Technology, Saying "People Were Not Even Allowed To Use Mobile Devices
Because Of Security Issues."  "Personally, having, you know, lived and
worked in the White House, having been a senator, having been Secretary
of State, there has traditionally been a great pool of very talented,
hard-working people.  And just as I was saying about the credit market,
our personnel policies haven’t kept up with the changes necessary in
government.  We have a lot of difficulties in getting—when I got to the
State Department, we were so far behind in technology, it was
embarrassing.  And, you know, people were not even allowed to use mobile
devices because of security issues and cost issues, and we really had to
try to push into the last part of the 20th Century in order to get
people functioning in 2009 and ‘10." [Goldman Sachs Builders And
Innovators Summit, 10/29/13]

CLINTON REMARKS ARE PRO KEYSTONE AND PRO TRADE

Clinton: "So I Think That Keystone Is A Contentious Issue, And Of Course
It Is Important On Both Sides Of The Border For Different And Sometimes
Opposing Reasons…" "So I think that Keystone is a contentious issue, and
of course it is important on both sides of the border for different and
sometimes opposing reasons, but that is not our relationship.  And I
think our relationship will get deeper and stronger and put us in a
position to really be global leaders in energy and climate change if we
worked more closely together.  And that's what I would like to see us
do." [Remarks at tinePublic, 6/18/14] * * *

Hillary Clinton Said Her Dream Is A Hemispheric Common Market, With Open
Trade And Open Markets. "My dream is a hemispheric common market, with
open trade and open borders, some time in the future with energy that is
as green and sustainable as we can get it, powering growth and
opportunity for every person in the hemisphere."  [05162013 Remarks to
Banco Itau.doc, p. 28] * * *

Hillary Clinton Said We Have To Have A Concerted Plan To Increase Trade;
We Have To Resist Protectionism And Other Kinds Of Barriers To Trade.
"Secondly, I think we have to have a concerted plan to increase trade
already under the current circumstances, you know, that Inter-American
Development Bank figure is pretty surprising. There is so much more we
can do, there is a lot of low hanging fruit but businesses on both sides
have to make it a priority and it's not  for governments to do but
governments can either make it easy or make it hard and we have to
resist, Protectionism, other kinds of barriers to market access and to
trade and I would like to see this get much more attention and be not
just a policy for a year under president X or president Y but a
consistent one." [05162013 Remarks to Banco Itau.doc, p. 32]

CLINTON IS MORE FAVORABLE TO CANADIAN HEALTH CARE AND SINGLE PAYER

Clinton Said Single-Payer Health Care Systems "Can Get Costs Down," And
"Is As Good Or Better On Primary Care," But "They Do Impose Things Like
Waiting Times." "If you look at countries that are comparable, like
Switzerland or Germany, for example, they have mixed systems.  They
don't have just a single-payer system, but they have very clear controls
over budgeting and  accountability. If you look at the single-payer
systems, like Scandinavia, Canada, and elsewhere, they can get costs
down because, you know, although their care, according to statistics,
overall is as good or better on primary care, in particular, they do
impose things like waiting times, you know.  It takes longer to get like
a hip replacement than it might take here." [Hillary Clinton remarks to
ECGR Grand Rapids, 6/17/13] * * *

Clinton Cited President Johnson’s Success In Establishing Medicare And
Medicaid And Said She Wanted To See The U.S. Have Universal Health Care
Like In Canada. "You know, on healthcare we are the prisoner of our
past.  The way we got to develop any kind of medical insurance program
was during World War II when companies facing shortages of workers began
to offer healthcare benefits as an inducement for employment.  So from
the early 1940s healthcare was seen as a privilege connected to
employment.  And after the war when soldiers came back and went back
into the market there was a lot of competition, because the economy was
so heated up. So that model continued.  And then of course our large
labor unions bargained for healthcare with the employers that their
members worked for.  So from the early 1940s until the early 1960s we
did not have any Medicare, or our program for the poor called Medicaid
until President Johnson was able to get both passed in 1965. So the
employer model continued as the primary means by which working people
got health insurance.  People over 65 were eligible for Medicare.
Medicaid, which was a partnership, a funding partnership between the
federal government and state governments, provided some, but by no means
all poor people with access to healthcare. So what we've been struggling
with certainly Harry Truman, then Johnson was successful on Medicare and
Medicaid, but didn't touch the employer based system, then actually
Richard Nixon made a proposal that didn't go anywhere, but was quite far
reaching.  Then with my husband's administration we worked very hard to
come up with a system, but we were very much constricted by the
political realities that if you had your insurance from your employer
you were reluctant to try anything else.  And so we were trying to build
a universal system around the employer-based system. And indeed now with
President Obama's legislative success in getting the Affordable Care Act
passed that is what we've done.  We still have primarily an
employer-based system, but we now have people able to get subsidized
insurance.  So we have health insurance companies playing a major role
in the provision of healthcare, both to the employed whose employers
provide health insurance, and to those who are working but on their own
are not able to afford it and their employers either don't provide it,
or don't provide it at an affordable price. We are still struggling.
We've made a lot of progress.  Ten million Americans now have insurance
who didn't have it before the Affordable Care Act, and that is a great
step forward.  (Applause.) And what we're going to have to continue to
do is monitor what the costs are and watch closely to see whether
employers drop more people from insurance so that they go into what we
call the health exchange system.  So we're really just at the beginning.
  But we do have Medicare for people over 65.  And you couldn't, I don't
think, take it away if you tried, because people are very satisfied with
it, but we also have a lot of political and financial resistance to
expanding that system to more people. So we're in a learning period as
we move forward with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.  And
I'm hoping that whatever the shortfalls or the glitches have been, which
in a big piece of legislation you're going to have, those will be
remedied and we can really take a hard look at what's succeeding, fix
what isn't, and keep moving forward to get to affordable universal
healthcare coverage like you have here in Canada.  [Clinton Speech For
tinePublic – Saskatoon, CA, 1/21/15]   * * *

Below is the full 80 page documents of "speech flags" in Hillary
speeches: [...]


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